Emergencies

We care about your child’s comfort and want to ensure they remain pain-free. Scroll down to read some tips on first aid for common dental emergencies.

If your child faces a dental emergency during or after hours, feel free to call us. However, if you suspect an urgent medical emergency, please dial 9-1-1 or take your child to an emergency room.

Toothache

•••
Thoroughly clean the affected area with warm water. DO NOT place aspirin directly on the gum or on the aching tooth. If the face, neck or eye is swollen, apply cold compresses and go to the hospital emergency room. Call your pediatric dentist.

Broken Filling or Loose Crown

•••
Thoroughly clean the affected area. Rinse the mouth with warm water or use dental floss to dislodge impacted food or debris. Take Tylenol or ibuprofen as needed to control pain. Call your pediatric dentist.

Knocked Out Baby Tooth

•••
DO NOT  reimplant the tooth. Have your child rinse their mouth with water and then apply a cold compress. Bite down on gauze or a cloth to stop any bleeding. Call your pediatric dentist.

 

Broken Braces and Wires

•••
If a broken appliance can be removed easily, take it out. If it cannot, cover the sharp portion with wax. Loose or broken appliances typically do not require emergency attention. If a wire is stuck in the gum, cheek, or tongue, DO NOT remove it. Call your orthodontist.

Broken Tooth

•••
Have your child gently rinse their mouth with warm water, then apply a cold compress to the face. Try to locate and save the tooth fragment that broke off. Store the broken fragment in cold milk or plain water. Call your pediatric dentist.

Knocked Out Permanent Tooth

•••
Handle the tooth by the crown and NOT the root. If dirty, rinse the tooth. If the tooth is sound, try to reimplant it into the socket. Hold the tooth in place by biting gently on gauze. If unable to reimplant, store the tooth in cold milk. See your pediatric dentist ASAP.

Swelling/Abscesses

•••
Apply cold compresses to the affected area. Oral antibiotics may or may not be needed to treat the infection. Swelling of the face can be a sign of a serious infection that may need immediate attention. Call your pediatric dentist.

New Adult Tooth Growing Behind Baby Tooth

•••
Usually no treatment is necessary, as mother nature typically takes care of the baby tooth. In some cases, the baby tooth may need to be extracted. Call your pediatric dentist to determine the best course of action.

Fractured Jaw

•••
Immobilize the jaw by wrapping a towel or tie around the head and under the chin. Apply a cold compress to help reduce the swelling and take the patient to the nearest emergency room. Call an oral surgeon.

Toothache

•••
Thoroughly clean the affected area with warm water. DO NOT place aspirin directly on the gum or on the aching tooth. If the face, neck or eye is swollen, apply cold compresses and go to the hospital emergency room. Call your pediatric dentist.

Broken Braces or Wires

•••
If a broken appliance can be removed easily, take it out. If it cannot, cover the sharp portion with wax. Loose or broken appliances typically do not require emergency attention. If a wire is stuck in the gum, cheek, or tongue, DO NOT remove it. Call your orthodontist.

Swelling/Abscesses

•••
Apply cold compresses to the affected area. Oral antibiotics may or may not be needed to treat the infection. Swelling of the face can be a sign of a serious infection that may need immediate attention. Call your pediatric dentist.

Broken Filling or Loose Crown

•••
Thoroughly clean the affected area. Rinse the mouth with warm water or use dental floss to dislodge impacted food or debris. Take Tylenol or ibuprofen as needed to control pain. Call your pediatric dentist.

New Adult Tooth Growing Behind Baby Tooth

•••
Usually no treatment is necessary, as mother nature typically takes care of the baby tooth. In some cases, the baby tooth may need to be extracted. Call your pediatric dentist to determine the best course of action.

Fractured Jaw

•••
Immobilize the jaw by wrapping a towel or tie around the head and under the chin. Apply a cold compress to help reduce the swelling and take the patient to the nearest emergency room. Call an oral surgeon.

Broken Tooth

•••
Have your child gently rinse their mouth with warm water, then apply a cold compress to the face. Try to locate and save the tooth fragment that broke off. Store the broken fragment in cold milk or plain water. Call your pediatric dentist.

Knocked out baby tooth

•••
DO NOT reimplant the tooth. Have your child rinse their mouth with water and then apply a cold compress. Bite down on gauze or a cloth to stop any bleeding. Call your pediatric dentist.

Knocked out permanent tooth

•••
Handle the tooth by the crown and NOT the root. If dirty, rinse the tooth. If the tooth is sound, try to reimplant it into the socket. Hold the tooth in place by biting gently on gauze. If unable to reimplant, store the tooth in cold milk. See your pediatric dentist ASAP.

CERTIFICATIONS

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Visit The Pad

Jonathon Everett Lee, DDS, Inc.
Brian D. Lee, DDS, MSD, Inc.
Christian P. Yee, DDS
•••
1291 East Hillsdale Blvd., Suite 100
Foster City, CA 94404
•••
customercare@happyhealthyteeth.com
•••
Phone: 650-574-4447
Fax: 650-574-4041

 

Follow Us

 

Visit The Pad

Jonathon Everett Lee, DDS, Inc.
Brian D. Lee, DDS, MSD, Inc.
Christian P. Yee, DDS 
•••
1291 East Hillsdale Blvd., Suite 100
Foster City, CA 94404
•••
customercare@happyhealthyteeth.com
•••
Phone: 650-574-4447
Fax: 650-574-4041

 

CERTIFICATIONS

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 .    

 

Follow Us

 

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